Way of Truth Forums

A Forum Site For Christians Seeking the Way of Truth
 
HomeSearchRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 The English Language

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
TomL
Admin
avatar

Posts : 455
Join date : 2010-03-25
Age : 61
Location : Lebanon, PA

PostSubject: The English Language   Thu Aug 29, 2013 10:58 pm

Does anyone read the Bible within the constraints of the English language?  
 
It just amazes me that somehow the words in the Bible take on a whole new character than they do outside of the Bible.  How can anyone understand the Bible if words don't mean anything, or if you can change the meaning of the words on a whim?
 
I have encountered this everywhere throught all internet Chistianity.  Why?  Why can't people simply accept what the words of the Bible really mean, instead of changing the definitions along the way?
 
And this occurs in many doctrines.  In the doctrine Predestination, in Romans 8.29, the "foreknew," is used.  The literal meaning of that word is "to know before."  But some want to change that to mean "to love before."  
 
But, it is most often seen in regards to prophecy.  Somehow in Mathhew 24, the pronoun "you," means someone other that to whom Jesus was talking to.  Or, at least it was inclusive of people other than the disciples.  But, there is no indication of that in the text.  
 
And when John said, "The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave Him to show His servants—things which must shortly take place. And He sent and signified it by His angel to His servant John."   Revelation 1.1, NKJV.  Some how, the word "shortly" means something different here that it does in everyday conversation.  If I called my friend and said, "Are you ready to go to breakfast, I'll be there to pick you up shortly."  Do you think my friend will think that I won't be there for 2 years?  Or will she expect me within the hour?  So, why does the word "shortly" mean something different in the Bible than in our language today?
 
Then in Matthew 28.16-20.  It's plain, if you understand the English language, that Jesus was talking to the "eleven disciples."  But, somehow, it was also referring to every Christian that has ever lived.  But again, there is no indication of that in the text.
 
I could probably go on with this, but I think I made my point.

_________________
study - Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision. - 2 Timothy 2.15; ISV, isv.com
Back to top Go down
http://line2016.freeforums.net
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:49 am

(TomL)
Does anyone read the Bible within the constraints of the English language?

(rwr)
Good evening TomL …

Happened to notice your signature statement from 2Tim 2:15 … it's a good thing to always keep in mind when perusing the scriptures. Also, noted that your quote is from the ISV, any particular reason you like/use this translation?

Back to top Go down
TomL
Admin
avatar

Posts : 455
Join date : 2010-03-25
Age : 61
Location : Lebanon, PA

PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:52 am

rwr wrote:
(TomL)
Does anyone read the Bible within the constraints of the English language?

(rwr)
Good evening TomL …

Happened to notice your signature statement from 2Tim 2:15 … it's a good thing to always keep in mind when perusing the scriptures. Also, noted that your quote is from the ISV, any particular reason you like/use this translation?


That is a long story. I will try to make it short.

I have been a student of weather for a long time. I just love studying the weather. I even dabble in forecasting.

Well, I was looking at Genesis 1 from the weather perspective. I determined in my studies that the "firmament" in Genesis 1.6, the way it was described, I thought it sounded like a canopy. I even wrote about it, although not on any of my sites.

Well, a couple years ago, I was looking for online Bibles in translations I didn't already have. That is when I learned about the ISV. As I do with all translations, I look at specific verse to see how they are translated. My signature verse is one of them. I really like the way the ISV translates that verse, especially this part, "handling the word of truth with precision." That is the best translation of this verse I have ever seen. The same was true of the other verses I looked at. So, I decided to start at the beginning. I started reading Genesis 1. I was really impressed that they came out an said that God created the universe. "In the beginning, God created the universe."
I continued to read, and there it was. Genesis 1.6-8, "Then God said, 'Let there be a canopy between bodies of water, separating bodies of water from bodies of water!' So God made a canopy that separated the water beneath the canopy from the water above it. And that is what happened: God called the canopy “sky.” The twilight and the dawn were the second day." Well, considering what I wrote about the canopy, I was excited. Here is a translation that used the very same word I used. It was a word I used because of my knowledge of Scripture and weather.

I continued to read it and continued to be impressed. The only change I would make would be using "Jehovah" like the American Standard and the New World Translation, instead of the term "LORD God." Oh well, nothing in this world is perfect.

The International Standard Version is by far one of the very best translations I have ever encountered.

Now, I must get some  Sleep 

_________________
study - Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision. - 2 Timothy 2.15; ISV, isv.com
Back to top Go down
http://line2016.freeforums.net
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 5:29 am

Sometimes I go to a bible study. We all have different bibles and when someone else is reading, I don't know what they are talking about as mine is NIV. Sad
Back to top Go down
TomL
Admin
avatar

Posts : 455
Join date : 2010-03-25
Age : 61
Location : Lebanon, PA

PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:51 am

WhiteDove wrote:
Sometimes I go to a bible study.  We all have different bibles and when someone else is reading, I don't know what they are talking about as mine is NIV. Sad

I have found it advantageous to take the translation that the leader of the Bible study uses. I had the same problem when I use to go to Bible Studies. And that is the way I handled it. Now, can I see a smile?

_________________
study - Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision. - 2 Timothy 2.15; ISV, isv.com
Back to top Go down
http://line2016.freeforums.net
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:09 am

sunny 
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:51 pm

WhiteDove wrote:
Sometimes I go to a bible study.  We all have different bibles and when someone else is reading, I don't know what they are talking about as mine is NIV. Sad

(rwr)
Good morning WhiteDove (WD) …

Thought it interesting that you use the NIV, any particular reason?

As TomL suggests, it's probably best to use some standard bible
in bible study classes, and that may well be up to you to resolve;
that is, switch to whatever the study group moderator is using …
Or, if you do have good reasons for the version you prefer, then,
perhaps, that might make for some rather good discussions, too …

Just curious, but when you say that ...
"you don't know what they are talking about"
… is that only because the wording is arranged differently (syntax),
or is it that you find the verses (their readings) saying something
compleatly difference from what you understand your NIV to be saying?

Just curious, does the study group leader pause and explain when you
voice your concerns/questions, or is the study intended to get through
a particular subject matter, with little time alloted to stop and get into
a more specfic or individualized question?

It's been my experience, that these random or off-topic tangenting questions
tend to become the more interesting and fruitful discussions …
following where the spirit leads, in other words.
It also seems to bring everyone's insight, into the discussion, rather than
our just following behind ...
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 2:54 pm

(TomL)
...The only change I would make would be using "Jehovah" like the American Standard and the New World Translation, instead of the term "LORD God." Oh well, nothing in this world is perfect.

The International Standard Version is by far
one of the very best translations I have ever encountered.

(rwr)
Good morning TomL …

I have a number of different translations at home, but not this one … looked it up
and see that it has a number of good qualities; see also, that it "aims to be central
between a literal translation and an idiomatic translation," which is something that
is certainly helpful at times … That is, just as long as the reader knows and fully
understands that the easier reading, the dynamic or idiomatic paraphrasing is going
to obscure any number of amazing details … right.

That is, when your ISV or WhitDove's NIV use a particular word, or phrasing, which
differes from the more literal translation, a person should pause as ponder that … right.

Anyway, for anyone interested, there's a good summary of TomL's ISV …
on Wiki … can't give you the site address, as I'm still too new, here ...

(TomL)
...The only change I would make would be using "Jehovah" like the American Standard
and the New World Translation, instead of the term "LORD God."
Oh well, nothing in this world is perfect.

(rwr)
You got that right … nothing is perfect, when it comes to translations,
but you've, now, go tme interested in why you prefer that particular reading "Jehovah" …
That might make for another interesting topic thread … also, I find it interesting
that you favor the New World Translation … not many people outside of that
particular persuasion even know about it, let alone have studied from it?

Me, I do have one of these; it has it's good points, and a lot of bad ones, too …
But then different insights are valuable when trying to dig deeper into what any
particular verse is saying … even if the insight is sometimes subjectively driven … right.

But back to WhiteDove (WD), I was just thinking that if she sometimes has a problem
with understanding what some other version is saying, when it's not exactly like her NIV …
Well, I've found a rather good tool, for quick reference, is the following web site (see below)
where nine different English versions (popular versions) are compared side by side … not that
eother the NIV or ISV are included, but it does give one a rather wide spectrum of readings,
against which to evaluate either your ISL and/or WD's NIV …that is, there be wisdom in a mltitude of counselors …right.    

World Wide Web (WWW) greeknewtestament (Dot Comm)

(TomL)
...The only change I would make would be using "Jehovah"

(rwr)
Not that I'm in agreement with you concering this particular example, but I do think that our
popular translations have missed the boat on properly naming things … that is, I think a good
case could be made for restoring the original names, because the elimination of these original
appellations has "de-racinated" the New Covenant (New Testament) characters and places; their ethnic heritage has been clouded, and the ambience and original people vanished, along with all their regional colors. That is, I'd like to see the Greek, Aramaic, and Hebrew appellations, even some of the Roman names be given in their Latin original…

For instance, I'd start with "Jesus," from the Greek ‘iEsous;” from the Hebrew “Yeshua;” from the Hebrew “Yehoshua;” from two Hebrew nouns: 1) YHWH the covenant name, and 2) salvation.

That is, His real name …
what His mommy called Him, and what His disciples called Him is …"Yeshua" …
Just perhaps, this is what we should call Him, when asking God for anything in His name … Ummm?

And then, of course, there's His title "Christ" ...derives from the Septuagint translation of Mashiah, meaning Messiah; from the Greek “christos” meaning “Anointed,” an attribute of the Messiah. The more direct transliteration of “Mashiah” being “Messiah,” rather than “Christ” (an attribute of the Messiah). As a result of this misleading translation from the Hebrew “Mashiah” to the Greek “christos,” we have “Christ the Messiah,” which should be “Messiah the Christ,” or “the anointed Messiah.”

I tend to think of Him as …Yeshua the Annointed …
but then I wouldn't say that publicly, people would think me weird

(Sophie)
This is "public," and you are weird, Robin …

(rwr)
Ah shucks, Hon, yu weent an tollum mi name ...
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:34 pm


"Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker
who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision."
(2Timothy 2.15; ISV)

(TomL)
... when I learned about the ISV. As I do with all translations, I look at specific verse to see how they are translated. My signature verse is one of them. I really like the way the ISV translates that verse, especially this part, "handling the word of truth with precision." That is the best translation of this verse I have ever seen.

(rwr)
My mommy called me Robin … she's no longer alive, but when I was born, at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, some 67 years ago, she had a ground floor room, and the windows actually opened back then; there was also more open space around the hospital, very park like setting back them … anyway, it was an early Spring, and the robins were everywhere (mostly crows nowadays), especially in that park setting outside Moms room with the open window … robins love to sing, and it's a very pleasent voice they have, too … anyway, the sun was shinning, the Winter was past, the buds were on the trees, there was even a warm Chinook breeze blowing in from the south … life is wonderful, and Mom was happy … and a new mom, with me snuggled in her arms ...
(anyone remember when they let a new mother stay at the hospital for a few days … anyone?)

Mom was happy, the birds were joyfully singing their little hearts out …
(sorry, there were no shepherds living out in the fields nearby, this is Seattle after all,
but there was, indeed, a multitude of heavely hosts … red breasted, worm eating ones)

Mom was happy, the birds were joyfully singing their little hearts out …and
she thankfully and joyfully named me …Robin …
(a guy named "Robin" gets in a lot of fights over a name like that … I grew up strong; thanks Mom!)
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:37 pm

Very Happy 
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:37 pm

I will answer you question next time I am on. I have to sleep now.  Very Happy 
Back to top Go down
Yehushuan

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2014-02-18
Location : Amishland, PA

PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 5:51 pm

TomL wrote:
Does anyone read the Bible within the constraints of the English language?

Does anyone read the Bible within the constraints of the English language?  

I sure don’t.  And I’m not sure the bible should be read within the constraints of the English language as, for better or worse, the Bible wasn’t even written in English.

And this actually got me in trouble when I was 14.  At that time, my parents were taking me to a “non-denominational” church which ultimately went IFCA.  While running the sound equipment out in the foyer, I happened upon a copy of the magazine Christianity Today and was astonished to find that if one subscribed, the free offer was a copy of an interlinear edition of the original Greek texts.  The left hand page had the KJV in the left column, with the NIV in the right column.  The right hand page consisted of the current Nestle edition of the Greek manuscripts along with an “interlinear” (English words right underneath) as rendered by Dr. Alfred Marshal.

WOW.

Now I’ve been told I’m smarter than the average bear (which may only mean bears are really dumb) but even at 14 it wasn’t hard to understand from the hundreds of sermons I heard (104 a year including Sunday nights - plus) that the general teaching was that all the “original” manuscripts were “lost to time” and we only had the King (may he be blessed, long lived and prosperous) James Version authorized by King James (may he be blessed, long lived and prosperous).

And yet in contradiction to what I had always heard, here right in front of me was the offer to have IN MY HANDS the text as was written in the original language.  WOW.  WHAT BELIEVER WOULDN’T WANT TO USE THIS?

Well I found out the answer soon enough, of course, when at the age of 16, the church leadership of what had now become an official IFCA KJV only church discovered I had and read a copy of the Greek text of the New Testament, after which I was summarily excommunicated.  (Then again, one church excommunicated me for quietly praying for my unruly child in the middle of his holiness’ sermon.  So…)

In any case (sorry I digressed) over the years in college I was able to spend time reading Dr. Marshal’s rendition and able to compare passages between this, the NIV and the KJV only to discover somewhat to my horror, that the KJV is a rather crappy English version, and that the NIV borders on a cultic version, but not as bad as the NWT.  So I took Greek in seminary, and have translated many passages in the New Testament texts for myself.  (And I’ve not found any published English version where Ephesians 6:17 is translated correctly.)

While I readily admit that certain passages are subject to interpretation, I’ve also found that many passages which have perplexed me stand with clear intent when read in the language in which it had been written (Koine Greek).

So if one’s understanding depends upon what the words mean, then it also depends more upon what actual words are which were written (and what they mean).

This is not to say English versions don’t have their uses, nor is it to say that all believers must learn Koine Greek in order to understand the gospel (which ever one you hang onto).  But I think the Jewish mindset understands that words from God have meaning only if one understands the actual words from God.  (Which is why they teach Hebrew to their children.)  Why do they who reject Jesus as messiah have more respect for the words written than those who follow Him?

Quite frankly I’ve never understood this.

Yehushuan

PS: For what it’s worth, now that we have computers and the internet, I’ve found e-sword.net to be an adequate study tool for my purposes, along with an online lexicon from Liddell and Scott that is hosted by Tufts University.  I’d post links, but…

PPS: HEY TOM, can you update forum permissions to let me post external links?  Somehow I feel naked without being able to do this.  But I can wait if needs be.
Back to top Go down
Yehushuan

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2014-02-18
Location : Amishland, PA

PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:29 pm

(Paul-ish)
... ορθοτομουντα τον λογον της αληθειας

(Yehu)
... correctly teaching the pattern of the truth...

I mean after all, ορθοτομουντα is a present active participle ...

(Yehu's Muse)
Still playing with that Russian roulette thing eh?
Back to top Go down
Yehushuan

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2014-02-18
Location : Amishland, PA

PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:31 pm

Hey Tom,

If you could be so kind as to post the ISV rendition of Ephesians 6:17 I'd be most appreciative.

(Just not up to paying for the online access.)

Yehu
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:45 pm

(Yehu)
…...church discovered I had and read a copy of the Greek text of the New Testament,
after which I was summarily excommunicated.  

(Robin)
You should have been an Episcopalian Altar Boy … actually, altar servers, or acolytes can be either boy or girls, but I dont think that was just yet on the horizon, way back when I served, carrying the processional cross, lighting the candles, swinging the thurible, or handling the offering plates … that last service has a
story behind it, Father John use to depend upon us Boys to give him an accurate count of attendees ...
(from the ushers, when collecting the plates)
... so that he could subsequently pour out the appropriate amount of wine for Eucharistic
(Communion, call it what you will). There was dialogue with the assembly (Sursum Corda), concluding with the Sanctus. then the story of the Last Supper, and the presider then asking the Holy Spirit to come into the bread and wine … and into us. Then Father John after the symbolic bread breaking would tend to the more practical preparations … such as pouring additional chalices of wine, all the while mumbling the Fraction Anthem. And only then would the assemble be invited to the meal


Truth be told, Father John was a bit "into his wine," and we Boys knew this, and were expected to up the attendee count by a factor or two … or three or four; the reason for this, being that after all this, the meal was over, Father John then had to consume the remaining bread and  wine. Oddly enough, there was never much broken bread left over, but there was alway a chalice or two left over …

The service always got a little more interesting after that!

(Yehu)
Then again, one church excommunicated me for quietly praying for my unruly child in the middle of his holiness’ sermon …

(Robin)
You Rebel, you!

And, if I recall correctly, we're you also black listed at MIT
for daring to think …
outside the box, concerning matters of Artificial Intelligence (AI)
You'd have thunk that the IFCA would have cured yu athat there thingy ...

(Yehu)
In any case (sorry I digressed) …

(Robin)
Never happened on my watch …

(Yehu)
...able to compare passages, the NIV and the KJV only to discover somewhat to my horror, that the KJV is a rather crappy English version, and that the NIV borders on a cultic version, but not as bad as the NWT.  

(Robin)
The KJV is still the standard, from which most people begin to intelligently look into scriptures;
besides being a rather awsomely worded translation … it serves good use, the KJV, it does.
Can't vouch for the NIV, but I find that it's popular with many … perhaps it's easy on the ears, wat?
And, concerning the NWT … agreed, it's got a bushel load of problem, but now and then, when I'm
floundering about trying to find an appropriate English word for some Greek conundrumed text, it
has come in handy … credit due where credit earned.


(Yehu)
... and have translated many passages in the New Testament texts for myself.  
(And I’ve not found any published English version where Ephesians 6:17 is translated correctly.)

(Robin)
Promises, promises …

So how long do you figure it will take for you to be banned from this forum, dear friend and fellow?
They never ban me, any more … I'm the funny one … but also the boring one, most of the time.

(Yehu)
So if one’s understanding depends upon what the words mean,
then it also depends more upon what actual words are which were written (and what they mean).

(Robin)
I've been collecting quotes from your various post, concerning this … and another one for the books.

(Yehu)
This is not to say English versions don’t have their uses ...But I think the Jewish mindset understands that words from God have meaning only if one understands the actual words from God.  (Which is why they teach Hebrew to their children.)  

(TomL)
Does anyone read the Bible within the constraints of the English language?

(Robin)
Yes, Tom, sad to say, yes they do … and aint that a sad fact, especially when
we are told, by our apostle Paul to …(as you would read it) …
..."Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker" ...

(Dirty Harry)
Approved … an approved worker?

(TomLl)
...who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision.

Back to top Go down
Yehushuan

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2014-02-18
Location : Amishland, PA

PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:22 pm

(Yehu's Muse)
You know Robin's going to get you kicked out...

(Yehu)
But... I think he fired six shots. I really do.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 11:30 pm

"Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker
who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision."
(2Timothy 2.15; ISV)

(TomL)
... I really like the way the ISV translates that verse, especially this part, "handling the word of truth with precision." That is the best translation of this verse I have ever seen.

(Robin)
You may have noticed … you've got my interest, concerning this, the ISV reading of the verse;
but even more so, on how, exactly, you came to the conclusion that it's best translation?

That is, it read nicely, and there's nothing to critique about anyone really liking a particular reading, but whe you then say, it's the best [English] translation you've ever seen … I've just got to ask,
on what basis did you come to this conclusion … what standards did you use to evaluate it?

1) Based on a preference for the dynamic method of "translation," or the more literal?
2) Based on it's accuracy according to the underlying Greek text?
3) Based on a comparison with what other translations?
4) Which specific words, in this reading, did you find more edifying than in other translations?
5) Do you think that WhiteDove should use the ISV over the NIV?
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Wed Feb 19, 2014 11:32 pm

(Yehu's Muse)
That's only five shots ...
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:43 am

"Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker
who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision."
(2Timothy 2.15; ISV)

(TomL)
... I really like the way the ISV translates that verse, especially this part, "handling the word of truth with precision." That is the best translation of this verse I have ever seen.

(Robin)
Was curious if this might be one of those verses where there are variations between Greek source texts; that is, a variation between the Alexandrian source texts, and the Byzantine source texts …
I did check this out, and found that there aren't any variations, so that's one thing accounted for.

Next, I thought it would be a good idea to present some of the more popular readings, just so we
can readily see where the ISV does specifically differ ...

a) King James Version
Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed,
rightly dividing the word of truth.

b) American Standard Version
Give diligence to present thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, handling aright the word of truth.

c) Bible in Basic English
Let it be your care to get the approval of God, as a workman who has no cause for shame,
giving the true word in the right way.

d) Darby's English Translation
Strive diligently to present thyself approved to God, a workman that has not to be ashamed,
cutting in a straight line the word of truth.

e) Douay Rheims
Carefully study to present thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.

f) Noah Webster Bible
Study to show thyself approved to God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed,
rightly dividing the word of truth.

g) Weymouth New Testament
Earnestly seek to commend yourself to God as a servant who,
because of his straightforward dealing with the word of truth, has no reason to feel any shame.

h) World English Bible
Give diligence to present yourself approved by God, a workman who doesn't need to be ashamed, properly handling the Word of Truth.

i) Young's Literal Translation
be diligent to present thyself approved to God -- a workman irreproachable,
rightly dividing the word of the truth;

j) Concordant Literal New Testament
Endeavor to present yourselt to God qualified, [an] un-ashamed worker,
correctly cutting the word of truth.

k) The Writ of The New Covenant; Dabhar Translation
Be diligent to give yourself [as] standby, approved to the God [as] an unashamed worker,
correctly cutting the word of the truth

l) New King James Version (NKJV)
Be diligent to present yourself approved to the God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth

m) Tyndales's New Testament
Study to whew thyself laudable unto God a workman that needethe not to be ashamed, dividing the word of truth justly.

n) Jewish New Testament by David H. Stern
Do all you can to present yourself to God as someone worthy of his approval, as a worker with no need to be ashamed, because he deals straightforwardly with the Word of the Truth

o) A New Translation by James Moffatt
Do your utmost to let God see that you, at least are a sound workman, with no need to be ashamed of the way you handle the word of the Truth

p) The New Testament in Modern English by J.B. Phillips
For yourself, concentrate on winning God's approval, on being a workman with nothing to be ashamed of, and who knows how to use the word of truth to the best advantage.

q) The Emphasized Bible by Rotherham
Give diligence thyself approved to present unto God, - a workman not to be put to shame, Skilfully handling the word of truth.

r) New Revised Standard Version
Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved by him, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly explaining the word of truth.

s) The Apostolic Bible Polyglot by Charles Van der Pool
Hurry (yourself unadulterated) to present to God! a worker unashamed;
cutting straight the word of truth

t) The New Testament Recovery Version by Witness Lee
Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, an unashamed workman,
cutting straight the word of the truth

u) The New Testament Amplified by Jonathan Mitchell
Make haste, with earnest endeavor and diligence, to place yourself alonside as an approved workman in God, one without cause for shame, consistenly cutting a straight and direct path in, to, or with the Word of the Truth

v) The Restored New Testament by Willis Barnstone
Strive to present yourself before God as one who is without shame,
drawing a straight line of words for the truth

w) New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures
Do your utmost to present yourself approved to God, a workman with nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of the truth aright.

x) NIV
Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a workman who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth

y) The Living Bible Paraphrased
Work hard so God can say to you, "Well done." Be a good workman, one who does not need to be ashamed when God examines your work. Know what his Word says and means.

z) Disciples' Literal New Testament
Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker not-needing-to-be-ashamed,
cutting s-straight the word of truth.

aa) The New Testament by Richard Lattimore
Strive to present yourself to God as one who is worthy, a worker with nothing to be ashamed of,
drawing a straight line of argument for the truth.

Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Thu Feb 20, 2014 1:11 am

"Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker
who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision."
(2Timothy 2.15; ISV)

(TomL)
... I really like the way the ISV translates that verse, especially this part, "handling the word of truth with precision." That is the best translation of this verse I have ever seen.

(Robin)
Alright then, now with all that potpourri out of the way …

(Yehu's Muse)
A mixture of dried flower petals, leaves and spices,
which is used to make a room smell pleasant …

(Pepe Le Pew)
Hello Cheri, my le pel skunk fatale …
actually, my little stinker, the origins of  "pot pourri" are French, for rotten pot ...

(Robin)
Alright then, with that miscellaneous collection of English readings duly noted,
let's drop back to the original language, the actual Greek from both it's
Alexandrian and Byzantine source texts …

Below is 2Tim 2:15 in a transliterated form (easier on the eye; more recognizable than those squiggly looking Greek letters); following the original Greek syntax (word order), along with the Strong's number for each word, and
also the grammatical coding for each word's delcensions and parsings ...

"spoudason seauton dokimon parastEsai tO theO ergatEn anepaischunton orthotomounta ton logon tEs alEtheias"

spoudason {4704 V-AAM-2S} seauton {4572 F-2ASM} dokimon {1384 A-ASM} parastEsai {3936 V-AAN} tO {3588 T-DSM} theO {2316 N-DSM} ergatEn {2040 N-ASM} anepaischunton {422 A-ASM} orthotomounta {3718 V-PAP-ASM} ton {3588 T-ASM} logon {3056 N-ASM} tEs {3588 T-GSF} alEtheias {225 N-GSF}


(TomL)
... I really like the way the ISV translates that verse, especially this part, "handling the word of truth with precision." That is the best translation of this verse I have ever seen.

"Do your best to present yourself to God as an approved worker
who has nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of truth with precision."
(2Timothy 2.15; ISV)

(Robin)
So then, show me … show us, using the above actual words of God, how
your English reading precisely matches a word by word comparison … Ummmm
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Thu Feb 20, 2014 5:26 am

rwr wrote:
WhiteDove wrote:
Sometimes I go to a bible study.  We all have different bibles and when someone else is reading, I don't know what they are talking about as mine is NIV. Sad

(rwr)
Good morning WhiteDove (WD) …

Thought it interesting that you use the NIV, any particular reason?

As TomL suggests, it's probably best to use some standard bible
in bible study classes, and that may well be up to you to resolve;
that is, switch to whatever the study group moderator is using …
Or, if you do have good reasons for the version you prefer, then,
perhaps, that might make for some rather good discussions, too …

Just curious, but when you say that ...
"you don't know what they are talking about"
… is that only because the wording is arranged differently (syntax),
or is it that you find the verses (their readings) saying something
compleatly difference from what you understand your NIV to be saying?

Just curious, does the study group leader pause and explain when you
voice your concerns/questions, or is the study intended to get through
a particular subject matter, with little time alloted to stop and get into
a more specfic or individualized question?

It's been my experience, that these random or off-topic tangenting questions
tend to become the more interesting and fruitful discussions …
following where the spirit leads, in other words.
It also seems to bring everyone's insight, into the discussion, rather than
our just following behind ...  

I use the NIV because that is the only bible I have. I used to have a few bibles but I had some boxes missing from my last move and a couple of my bibles were in there.

The teacher uses the King James Version. I find it hard to understand.
I am thinking of changing study groups anyway so perhaps the next one will be better for my understanding.
Back to top Go down
Yehushuan

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2014-02-18
Location : Amishland, PA

PostSubject: Re: The English Language   Thu Feb 20, 2014 11:01 am

g) Weymouth New Testament
Earnestly seek to commend yourself to God as a servant who, because of his straightforward dealing with the word of truth, has no reason to feel any shame.

Don’t you just love how off the wall Weymouth is?  He’s like the Pelagius of translation.  It's so radically different yet one can't really pin down an error.

Yehu

PS: Watch it, my muse knows what Sophie does on the weekends.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: The English Language   

Back to top Go down
 
The English Language
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Comical Quotes About the Confusing English Language
» What is the oldest word in the English language
» Interesting Facts About the English Language
» 2nd Am English test (2nd Term)
» 'Subdermatoglyphic' (17 letters) is the longest isogram in English language!

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Way of Truth Forums  :: WAY OF TRUTH Christian Forums :: General Christian Forum-
Jump to: